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Posted by woodlandsacu@gmail.com on October 21, 2017 at 1:30 PM Comments comments (720)

Cancer Cure Update: Traditional Chinese Medicine Could Kill Cancer Cells, Study Shows

A new study from the University of Adelaide revealed that the complex mix of plant compounds used in Traditional Chinese Medicine could kill cancer cells.

The study, published in the journal Oncotarget, showed that the Traditional Chinese Medicine called Compound Kushen Injection (CKI) could trigger the patterns of gene expression that affects the same pathways as western chemotherapy. However, CKI acts on different genes in the same pathway.

"Most Traditional Chinese Medicine is based on hundreds or thousands of years of experience with their use in China," explained Professor David Adelson, Director of the Zhendong Australia - China Centre for the Molecular Basis of Traditional Chinese Medicine and lead author of the study, in a statement. "There is often plenty of evidence that these medicines have a therapeutic benefit, but there isn't the understanding of how or why."

For the study, the researchers applied CKI to breast cancer cells grown in the laboratory. Using high-throughput next generation sequencing technologies, the researchers identified the genes and biological pathways targeted by CKI.

The researchers discovered that the CKI could alter genes that regulate the cell cycle of division and death. By doing so, CKI could change the cell cycle to push cancer cells down to the cell death pathway, therefore killing the cancer cells.

Compound kushen injection is a well-known Traditional Chinese Medicine that is composed of queous extracts from the roots of Kushen (Radix Sophorae Flavescentis) and Baituling (Rhizoma Smilacis Glabrae). CKI contains numerous chemicals including alkaloids, such as matrine and oxymatrine, flavonoids, alkylxanthones, quinones, triterpene glycosides, fatty acids, and essential oils.

Like other Traditional Chinese Medicine, individual compounds of CKI don't have much effect on their own. However, when the compounds are combined together, it can be effective in treating myriad of diseases with potentially lesser side-effects.



Food additive that may prevent skin cancer revealed by scientists

Posted by woodlandsacu@gmail.com on January 29, 2016 at 1:35 PM Comments comments (257)

Researchers at the University of Arizona College of Pharmacy have discovered that a compound found in the natural food additive annatto prevents the formation of cancer cells and skin damage from UV radiation in mice. In the future the compound, bixin, may be valuable in the prevention and treatment of human skin cancers.  Read more at: 

http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2016/01/160128155109.htm

Mindfulness-based stress reduction diminishes chemo brain

Posted by woodlandsacu@gmail.com on January 29, 2016 at 1:35 PM Comments comments (119)

Participation in a mindfulness-based stress reduction program yields robust and sustained improvement in cancer-related cognitive impairment, a prevalent and potentially debilitating condition that affects attention, memory and executive function in survivors, according to a new study from the Regenstrief Institute and Indiana University School of Medicine.  To read more, 

http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2015/12/151207131717.htm

Fruit and vegetables aren't only good for a healthy body; they protect your mind too

Posted by woodlandsacu@gmail.com on January 29, 2016 at 1:20 PM Comments comments (36)

Eating a Mediterranean diet or other healthy dietary pattern, comprising of fruit, vegetables, legumes, and nuts and low in processed meats, is associated with preventing the onset of depression, according to research published in the open access journal BMC Medicine. A large study of 15,093 people suggests depression could be linked with nutrient deficits.  To read more, 

http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2015/09/150916215535.htm



THIS MUSHROOM USED IN CHINESE MEDICINE HELPS MICE LOSE WEIGHT

Posted by woodlandsacu@gmail.com on June 23, 2015 at 6:55 PM Comments comments (153)

THIS MUSHROOM USED IN CHINESE MEDICINE HELPS MICE LOSE WEIGHT

IT WORKS BY FEEDING THE MICROBIOME

In the wild, a mushroom called "lingzhi" in China or "reishi" in Japan grows on dead trees in forests all over the world. But for about 2,000 years, herbalists all over Asia have been cultivating Ganoderma lucidum for its medicinal properties; it has long been thought of as a cure-all, reducing the effects of everything from asthma to heart palpitations—including anti-diabetic effects. Now a team of Taiwanese researchers has found that the mushroom’s extract can help obese mice lose weight, according to a study published today in Nature Medicine. Their hope is that the extract could also be used to help counter the human obesity epidemic, which endangers millions of lives worldwide.

http://www.popsci.com/mushroom-used-chinese-medicine-helps-mice-lose-weight

Drug makers are interested in an ancient Chinese medicine after Harvard found out how it works

Posted by woodlandsacu@gmail.com on June 23, 2015 at 6:50 PM Comments comments (59)

Drug makers are interested in an ancient Chinese medicine after Harvard found out how it works

A company that specialises in turning university research into marketable drugs is licensing Harvard research related to the blue evergreen hydrangea root, a part of the plant that has been used in traditional Chinese medicine for centuries.

 

http://www.businessinsider.com/allied-bristol-life-sciences-license-harvard-research-on-chinese-medicine-the-blue-hydrangea-root-2015-6


Non-invasive accupoint stimulation may be a new bioelectronics approach to Crohn's Disease

Posted by woodlandsacu@gmail.com on June 23, 2015 at 3:55 PM Comments comments (174)

Non-invasive accupoint stimulation may be a new bioelectronics approach to Crohn’s Disease

June 9, 2015

International Neuromodulation Society

 

The controlled clinical trial at the First Affiliated Hospital of Nanjing Medical University Department of Gastroenterology by principal investigator Hongjie Zhang, M.D., a gastroenterologist, is designed to try to reduce the inflammatory response underlying the chronic gastrointestinal disorder.

 

The study recruited 17 Crohn's disease patients and 20 matched healthy controls between June 2014 and December 2014. The patients receive transdermal accupoint electrical stimulation (TAES) for an hour twice a day, two hours after a meal, at an accupoint on the stomach meridian below the knee -- the Zusanli (ST 36).

 

The study was initially suggested to Zhang by Jiande Chen, Ph.D. of the Division of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Johns Hopkins Medicine, Baltimore.

 

"We have published numerous studies showing that electrical stimulation via the acupuncture points using surface electrodes can enhance vagal activity," he commented. "By enhancing vagal activity, we have shown in animals with intestinal inflammation that such electrical stimulation can suppress pro-inflammatory cytokines and thus reduce inflammation." Those data are being prepared for publication.

 

In the clinical study, the patients receive the electrical stimulation through a watch-sized stick-on device, powered by a watch battery. The needle-less stimulation device can deliver a variety of stimulation digitally, and was developed by Chen through a grant from the National Institutes of Health.

 

For the first three days, stimulation is administered at the hospital, and then the patients are instructed in use of the stimulator and sent home with a photo to help them identify the accupoint.

 

The patients are evaluated at 3 days, 14 days, and 30 days. Based on data from an initial 17 patients after 3 days of stimulation sessions, Zhang said an imbalance between the sympathetic and parasympathetic branches of the autonomic nervous system was evident.

 

Crohn's disease activity index (CDAI) scores are taken at each evaluation. The index tracks abdominal pain, diarrhea, physical signs (i.e. average daily temperature, abdominal mass), medication use (i.e. loperamide or opiate use for diarrhea), laboratory results (such as hematocrit) and body weight.

 

The research team also gathers blood and stool samples to assess levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines and gut hormones that are biomarkers of inflammation or autonomic nervous system imbalance. The effect of stimulation on autonomic nervous system balance is also non-invasively evaluated by analyzing heart rate variability.

 

Additional co-authors include Jingjing Ma, M.D. and Jiewen Su, M.D., who are contributing to the sample collection, TAES investigation, and data analysis at the First Affiliated Hospital of Nanjing Medical University. Professor Chen helped with the study design and is providing the TAES device. Dr. Zhang conceived the study and designed and supervised the experiments. The study was supported in part by the Key Medical Personnel of Jiangsu Province (no. RC2011063).

 

"We really expect CDAI to go down after chronic TAES," Zhang commented.

 

Story Source:

 

The above post is reprinted from materials provided by International Neuromodulation Society. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.




Daily sugar-sweetened beverage habit linked to non-alcoholic fatty liver disease

Posted by woodlandsacu@gmail.com on June 7, 2015 at 9:55 PM Comments comments (247)

Daily sugar-sweetened beverage habit linked to non-alcoholic fatty liver disease

Date:  June 5, 2015

Source:  Tufts University

Summary:  A daily sugar-sweetened beverage habit may increase the risk for non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD), researchers report. NAFLD is characterized by an accumulation of fat in the liver cells that is unrelated to alcohol consumption. NAFLD is diagnosed by ultrasounds, CT, MRI, or biopsy, and many of the approximately 25% of Americans with the disease don’t experience any symptoms.

http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2015/06/150605182352.htm

#sugarliverdisease #fattyliver


Top salads with eggs to better absorb vegetables' carotenoids

Posted by woodlandsacu@gmail.com on June 7, 2015 at 9:55 PM Comments comments (7)

Top salads with eggs to better absorb vegetables' carotenoids

 

Date:  June 5, 2015

Source:  Purdue University

Summary:  Adding eggs to a salad with a variety of raw vegetables is an effective method to improve the absorption of carotenoids, which are fat-soluble nutrients that help reduce inflammation and oxidative stress, according to research.

http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2015/06/150605182818.htm


Component in green tea may help reduce prostate cancer in men at high risk

Posted by woodlandsacu@gmail.com on June 7, 2015 at 9:50 PM Comments comments (414)

Component in green tea may help reduce prostate cancer in men at high risk

Date: May 28, 2015

Source: H. Lee Moffitt Cancer Center & Research Institute

Summary: Prostate cancer is the second most common type of cancer in men and is predicted to result in an estimated 220,000 cases in the United States in 2015. A team of researchers recently published results of a randomized trial that assessed the safety and effectiveness of the active components in green tea to prevent prostate cancer development in men who have premalignant lesions.

 http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2015/05/150528145210.htm

#prostatecancergreentea #preventprostatecancer


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